(@deborahl)

1. Successful Strategies

Raise Parental Expectations for Inclusive Employment

Parents participating in this discussion have high expectations that their adult children will work in inclusive settings doing work that reflect their strengths and interests. This is NOT the case for many many families. Even if parents do have such expectations they may not have a clue about how to ensure that their son or daughter with significant disabilities receives the supports they need in the workplace. Parent... more »

Voting

27 votes
27 up votes
0 down votes
Ideate
(@michelle.halman)

1. Successful Strategies

Business / School Partnership

A school could partner with a large, local business. Relationships may already exist between the business and VR. Teachers and Administrators don't have to reinvent the wheel to build one for themselves - ask VR for assistance. A business could: 1. Provide Career Mentoring for students 2. Hold a practice job fair at the business 3. Be a guest speaker in a classroom 4. Provide workplace tours 5. Practice interview... more »

Voting

13 votes
13 up votes
0 down votes
Ideate
(@david.hoff)

1. Successful Strategies

Integrating Individuals into Industry Credential Programs

When we talk about Career Pathways, it's critical that we focus on skill development and credentials. A strategy that I feel is under-utilized, is supporting individuals with significant disabilities in training programs that result in industry-recognized credentials in the trades, health care, and other industries. The idea is to integrate individuals into existing training programs (not create something separate),... more »

Voting

20 votes
20 up votes
0 down votes
Ideate
(@lisabjester)

1. Successful Strategies

Career Fair as way to educate employers

One strategy that has been successful for me with my students is attending career/job fairs. This gives the students an opportunity to practice their conversation and social skills and allows me time to network with hiring professionals and share my students abilities and career goals. Many of my students have been able to secure jobs through this strategy.

Voting

11 votes
12 up votes
1 down votes
Ideate
(@barbee1012)

2. Barriers and Challenges

Competitive Productivity & Communicating Benefits

Some employers are hesitant to employ people with disabilities due to fears they won't be as productive as a "typical" peer. Forums to educate business leaders might include: Chambers of Commerce, annual meetings for certain professional organizations, etc. Perhaps these presentations can be done in collaboration with local colleges who offer educational programs or majors related to disabilities, business, human resources... more »

Voting

7 votes
7 up votes
0 down votes
Ideate
(@barbee1012)

2. Barriers and Challenges

Transportation: Training & Availability

I live in a suburban/semi-rural area with limited public transportation. My son relies on a door-to-door para-transit service that only operates M-F during mostly daytime hours. The service is somewhat unreliable and arriving late to work can cause issues. He works in food service, and would have more job opportunities if he had access to transportation for evenings and weekends. In areas with public transportation,... more »

Voting

6 votes
7 up votes
1 down votes
Ideate
(@barbee1012)

1. Successful Strategies

Tax credits or incentives

Some successful employment opportunities have come from parents or professionals who start businesses designed to train and employ people with disabilities. (there are several in Colorado) Enact legislation to provide tax credits or other incentives to start businesses which employ people with disabilities. Do case studies on these successful business models and disseminate this information to the broader community... more »

Voting

4 votes
4 up votes
0 down votes
Ideate
(@jeichler)

1. Successful Strategies

ACCOMMODATION vs TRUE TEAMWORK

I think we are going about this all wrong. It's all about teaching people how to be good co-workers. We live in a world where the people who are atypical are expected to fit in and function, often at a level that makes no sense to them and causing significant underutilization of what they could actually offer if given the opportunity. Why not provide opportunities throughout the educational system (preschool through college... more »

Voting

3 votes
4 up votes
1 down votes
Ideate
(@kporter)

1. Successful Strategies

Transition to Community Employment

Concerned about lack of programs that really 'put people to work' in our community, and after searching nationally for programs that would address both the individuals' and employer needs, we looked at the top workplace employability skills that lead to success on the job and other areas of life, like communication, teamwork. problem solving, initiative and self-starting, planning and organising. self-management, learning... more »

Voting

6 votes
6 up votes
0 down votes
Ideate
(@nmatherly)

3. Training and Technical Assistance

Training Ideas

To address this question: What training and technical assistance do you think agencies need in order to successfully create and implement inclusive career pathways? In my community, I would like to see my clients have the ability to be trained in: *cash handling, *computer skills beyond social media, Microsoft office *handyman skills like painting and simple plumbing, *customer service, *auto repairs, ie: oil change... more »

Voting

10 votes
10 up votes
0 down votes
Ideate
(@tbrigham)

2. Barriers and Challenges

Educate employers

Its vital to get into the community to connect with as many employers as possible. Offering training and education on subjects such as disability, assistive technology, work site accommodations, resources, etc...could go a long way in opening doors for careers they wouldn't have known were options for individuals with disabilities.

Voting

6 votes
6 up votes
0 down votes
Ideate
(@nmatherly)

2. Barriers and Challenges

Work with local employers

IDEA: If there is an employer in your area looking for a certain skill set, work with local schools or rehab agencies to teach job-seekers the specific skills needed for employment with that particular employer.

BARRIER: Many of my clients do not want to go back to school. They feel they are done with school and should be working.

Voting

6 votes
6 up votes
0 down votes
Ideate